Monthly Archives: November 2016

Cosmetic procedures and cosmetic treatment options

As a culture, we are growing increasingly fixated on altering our appearances through eitherplastic surgery or cosmetic procedures of some kind. In fact, according to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS), in 2009 more than 310,000 women had their breasts augmented and 283,735 had liposuction performed. Add in the 2.5 million who had Botox injections and 1.3 million who used hyaluronic fillers like Juvederm and Restylane and it’s clear that this is no passing trend — even though as a nation we’re struggling with our finances! According to the ASAPS, despite the fact that the economy is floundering, in 2009 overall demand for procedures only dropped 2 percent over the previous year. And, as science continues to advance and more and more procedures become non-invasive, quick fixes with little-to-no downtime, the numbers are bound to increase.

See the 5 plastic surgeries and cosmetic procedures you didn’t know existed.

Take something like Botox which has only been approved by the FDA for cosmetic purposes since 1992 — in 18 short years it’s become completely mainstream and common place with millions of people having it injected at med spas on their lunch break. Incredible.

But, for every cosmetic procedure that becomes a household name, there are many that come and go without notice from the masses. Curious about processes that might be flying under the radar now? Well, we did some research to uncover what people are having done that you may not have known was an option.

From having semi-permanent mascara applied to freezing your fat away, take a look atthese five procedures and see what you think. Would you ever try them?

What it is: Developed at the Wellman Center for Photomedicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, it is the first non-invasive procedure approved by the FDA to reduce fat using cryolipolysis, a process that freezes fat cells.

How it’s done: Using a patented device, a target area (like love handles) is sandwiched between two cooling panels. For up to three hours the patient lies on their side while the panels freeze the fat cells. Afterwards, the “patient’s body goes to work” and over the next two to four months, the crystallized fat cells break down, begin to shrink, disappear then are completely eliminated from the body naturally. Results are permanent if you keep the fat off by regularly exercising and by eating healthfully.

Downtime: Zero. The procedure is non-invasive so patients can resume normal activities immediately.

Beauty tips to help you fix a broken nail

After all the time you spend primping in front of your bathroom mirror, it can be frustrating when you realize your perfectly powdered nose has become an oily t-zone that could use its own road sign (Warning, slippery nose ahead!). Or your expertly curled “beachy” waves have turned into a frizzy beehive. Or your freshly manicured nails start to chip and break.

You get the drift.

Drooping eyelashes, greasy roots, a random bug bite on your face — we’ve all been caught with a beauty emergency when we don’t have our go-to hair care and makeup kits by our side.

See how to fix beauty emergencies on the go now.

And while beauty catastrophes like these may not be avoidable, you can be prepared. We’re not suggesting you try to shove the contents of your vanity table into your cute little clutch. Instead, we’re going to give you crafty beauty tips that show you how to use everyday objects — ones you can find on the fly — to fix even your biggest beauty emergencies.

You’ll never look at a matchbox the same way again.

It’s the tenth frame, and you’re down by 7 pins. But thanks to your sweaty palm, an early release of the ball causes you to lose the game and a nail. Whether you’re bowling with friends or out and about and find yourself with a broken nail with no clipper as far as the eye can see, snag a matchbox. You can use its rough striking surface as a makeshift nail file.

Explain whether the wacky beauty tip

Throughout our lives we’re constantly dished advice. We’re told what to do, and not do in order to save money, lose weight, look younger, get a great job, find a husband etc., etc.

Once we hear advice, whether we actually heed it or not, we usually pass it on to someone else. Then, they do the same. Until suddenly, one day, everyone around you starts to believe that you have to swear off carbs to lose weight or apply toothpaste to a pimple in order for it to magically vanish overnight.

Skip ahead to see if theweirdest beauty tips you’ve heard actually work.

We as women hear tons of weird DIY beauty tips that have been passed down from our mothers, girlfriends or even from the woman sitting next to us at the nail salon. But, hearing so much advice leaves us beauty enthusiasts of the world wondering: Do these wacky beauty tips actually work? And even though I might have tried a tip to test its legitimacy, have I just convinced myself that I saw results because I’ve been told so many times that I should (much like the placebo effect)? Or is there verifiable evidence from beauty experts that confirms the effectiveness of that weird thing your Aunt Meryl told you to do to fight frizz?

To answer that last question — yes, now there is. We compiled from our Facebook page some of the weirdest and most random beauty tips you’ve heard and asked beauty experts to weigh in on their legitimacy. Here they share whether these tips actually dowork, or if they are totally bogus.

Weird Tip: I heard mayo is a good deep conditioner for your hair? Does it really work? — MaryAnn via Facebook

Expert answer: “With all the good products out there, why would one ever want to put mayonnaise in her hair? I mean the smell alone is enough to do damage. Because of the fat and oils in mayonnaise, yes it does condition damaged hair follicles by coating [them] with oil, but I just cannot encourage this wacky treatment. Instead, try a deep conditioning mask that is specifically formulated for hair,” says celebrity hairstylist and hair expert Rene Fris.

Beauty and make up guide

You might think that because models are so stunning, exotic, sexy, what have you, that they don’t need much in the way of hair and makeup to look fabulous. Think again.

See the backstage beauty tips that work in real life.

While covering the shows at New York Fashion Week, we saw first hand what it takes to get naturally gorgeous, freakishly thin and tall models runway ready. It’s truly no small feat. They, like us “real” women, have dark circles, split ends, chapped lips, dull complexions, etc., etc. It’s true. Fashion Week is like boot camp for models — it’s physically challenging. Their skin and hair is put through rigorous heat styling and backcombing and their poor faces have had makeup applied and scrubbed off multiple times in a day. This training leaves them looking more like we do every day (just being honest here).

That’s why the artists working in the trenches backstage have such very important jobs to do. In mere minutes (yes, on occasion they literally have five to 10 minutes to get a model completely ready) they turn these girls into the glamazons we know them to be. And they do it by using the beauty tips they’ve picked up over the years. The go-to secrets that have worked for them over and over again on red carpets, at photo shoots and, obviously, while backstage.

They were nice enough to share some of these secrets with us. Seriously, they had to style hair or apply makeup — under serious time pressure — while we hovered over them, notebooks in hand. Thank you beautiful, talented artists!

Work Grooming Guide

When it comes to grooming, some gals are divas, some are minimalists, and some are just plain out of their element lazy. While many will stop at nothing to preen and primp, others just can’t be bothered. Chalk it up to time constraints, lack of skills, or maybe even the old “ignorance is bliss” mantra but at some point — like NOW –you’re going to have to face the harsh reality that leaving the house looking like you just rolled out of bed hasn’t been socially acceptable since college (and even then it was iffy).

Skip ahead to see our lazy girl’s guide to grooming.

Listen, don’t feel bad, you’re not alone. In fact, celebrity makeup and hair pro Jeffrey Paul says the ‘no muss, no fuss’ motto is more common than you might think. “Not all women want to be experts in the field of makeup and hair,” says Paul. “Most just want to spend less than five minutes getting ready.” But what’s a lazy girl to do when she just can’t be bothered to pluck and curl and polish and spritz herself into gorgeousness? Why, rely on shortcuts, of course. There are the old emergency standbys, like pulling on jeans if you didn’t shave your legs or wearing your thick framed glasses instead of applying eye makeup, but what if you want a regular routine that requires minimum effort yet leaves you looking pretty and polished?

We chatted with skin, hair, and makeup experts for genius grooming tips, that will enable your primping process to become nearly effortless. Plus, we’ve included our top product picks that are guaranteed to un-complicate your morning routine. So� If you’re ready to dupe everyone into thinking you clocked hours in front of your vanity when you really hit that snooze button a couple/three times, read on.

There’s a towelette for everything these days. You can apply your sunscreen, remove makeup, and even fix your hair with these mess-free tools that only require a quick swipe. A few of our favorites? Ted Gibson Hair Sheets, $25, which smooth pesky flyaways;Supergoop Sunscreen Swipes with Zinc, $34, which provide UV protection; and Earth Therapeutics Tea Tree Oil Foot Wipes, $5.99, which clean and cool toes and feet.

Celebrity makeup artist Tina Turnbow (clients include Olivia Wilde and Claire Danes) recommends cleansing cloths that contain calming ingredients such as aloe vera, cucumber, and chamomile to prevent irritation. We suggestYes To Cucumbers Facial Towelettes, $5.99.

Washington D.C.-based dermatologist Elizabeth Tanzi, MD, says despite the convenience these towelettes provide, hitting the sink is still essential to avoid breakouts. “Cleansing wipes are great but I advise my patients to give their face a full wash at least every two to three days.”

Make Up Mistake That You Should Know

In theory beauty editors shouldn’t be making makeup mistakes. We interview expert makeup artists all the time, we try new makeup products daily, and we write about bad makeup on celebrities and vow never to do the same to ourselves. But in reality, even the most experienced makeup mavens can mess up now and then.

That’s a lesson we learned the hard way when we talked to New York City makeup artist Susmta Patel. When she told us about 11 super-common makeup mistakes she sees almost daily, we were stunned. And more than a little embarrassed. Because all of us at some point or another had committed these blunders (and most of us thought we looked pretty good at the time to boot).

Click here to see 11 bad makeup mistakes you’re probably making.

However, once we recovered from our shock and humiliation, we were glad she shared. We’d rather know (and fix!) our makeup mistakes than strut around looking like clowns. And now that we know, we can share these mistakes with you, so you never walk out of the house with bad makeup (again). Plus, in the spirit of sisterhood and community, we’ve each ‘fessed up to the makeup mistakes we’ve committed. Join in and share which ones you’re guilty of — no judgment. After all, your confessions will make us feel a bit better about our own misguidedness.

Horrifying Beauty Tips Ever

Today’s women go to extraordinary lengths to look beautiful. From hair care to plastic surgery, makeup to skin care — we collectively spend billions of dollars to enhance our looks. We also invest countless hours collectingbeauty tips from girlfriends, hairdressers, magazines and, yes, beauty websites to learn how to combat common beauty issues and to keep up with the hottest trends.

Skip to see the nine most horrifying beauty tips from history now.

But have you ever wondered what our great, great grandchildren or women of the future will think of our many beauty practices? Will they consider us insane for using hemorrhoid cream to de-puff eyes or mayonnaise to moisturize our hair? Will the beauty tips we prescribe to today seem totally archaic and ridiculous to future generations?

We ask this question after doing some research into the beauty practices of the past. We found some of the beauty tips from history to be absolutely horrifying in that they were so extreme they could cause nausea, seizures, nosebleeds and even death — taking the whole “pain is beauty” mantra exceedingly literal. And what’s probably even scarier is that these tips were considered to be totally “normal” at the time.

So peruse the nine scary beauty tips from the past and question what it is you do today that might make this list in 10 to 100 years time.

Make up wedding tips

Some women dream about their weddings, gather inspiringwedding pics, and practically plan out every detail of their big days from the time they are little girls.

I was not one of those women.

It wasn’t that I was anti-marriage or anything, but outside a fleeting desire to end up with Leonardo DiCaprio after I saw “Romeo + Juliet” in junior high, I just never daydreamed much about weddings — and I certainly didn’t spend my downtime dog-earing photos in bridal magazines.

This wasn’t really an issue, until, eventually, I got engaged. Suddenly, everyone from my future mother-in-law to strangers at the grocery store were asking about the minute details of my pending wedding. And I had no idea what to say.

Click here to see how I turned my wedding inspiration pics into reality.

To the rescue: The Internet and all its wedding blog glory. I gorged myself on beautiful inspiration pics of every type of wedding imaginable until I gained some sense of what I liked — and more importantly, what I hated.

Once I had gathered my own arsenal of wedding inspiration, I had a tougher task in front of me. Most of the photos I loved came from weddings or wedding photo shoots that were professionally done — or done by amazingly crafty people who had (I’m assuming) far more money and free time than I did. How was I going to make this wedding a reality?

Keep reading to see how I pulled it off — and get some useful tips for planning your own wedding without losing too much of your sanity.

James and I got married March 2011 at Shade Hotel in Manhattan Beach, Calif. after dating for seven years (a crazy long time, I know). We kept it small-ish, with about 100 people, and tried to incorporate as many personal details as we could. We wrote the ceremony ourselves, asked our mentor/journalism professor (James and I met while working on the school paper in college) to officiate, chose our favorite foods for the reception, and played all our favorite music throughout the night. We definitely wanted a relaxed, party atmosphere so we kept all the details as casual and fun as possible.